Proposition 35 Passes

Reflecting massive voter support, Proposition 35 received yes votes from 81% of voters in California.

The state’s official voter guide ¬†included two summaries for each statewide ballot measure. One summary, in bullet-point format, appeared in the long-form description of each measure. A shorter form of the summary appeared on the ballot label in the front of the voter guide, where there was a short description of each measure.

The long-form summary for Proposition 35 said:

  • Increases criminal penalties for human trafficking, including prison sentences up to 15-years-to-life and fines up to $1,500,000.
  • Fines collected to be used for victim services and law enforcement.
  • Requires person convicted of trafficking to register as sex offender.
  • Requires sex offenders to provide information regarding Internet access and identities they use in online activities.
  • Prohibits evidence that victim engaged in sexual conduct from being used against victim in court proceedings.
  • Requires human trafficking training for police officers.

The short-form (ballot label) summary for Proposition 35 said:

“Increases prison sentences and fines for human trafficking convictions. Requires convicted human traffickers to register as sex offenders.Requires registered sex offenders to disclose Internet activities and identities.”

Neither of the two summaries in the final voter guide was identical to the summary that was originally given to Proposition 35, when its sponsors sought a summary prior to circulating petitions to qualify the measure for the ballot. The summary that was given by election officials to Proposition 35 at that time said:

“Increases criminal penalties for human trafficking, including prison sentences up to 15-years-to-life and fines up to $1,500,000. Fines collected to be used for victim services and law enforcement. Requires person convicted of trafficking to register as sex offender. Requires sex offenders to provide information regarding Internet access and identities they use in online activities. Prohibits evidence that victim engaged in sexual conduct from being used against victim in court proceedings. Requires human trafficking training for police officers.”